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Feeding Your Baby in the First Year: The How & When of Food Textures

Parent question: "When should I start solids?"

Parent question: "How & when do I increase the texture?"


From 6 to 12 months your baby will begin to accept more solid foods and start to learn to feed him/herself. It is very exciting when your child starts to show interest in what you are eating. Feeding is a developmental process that babies follow at their own pace. It’s more important to consider your child’s developmental readiness rather than offering textures based on his/her age. This especially applies to children with developmental delays and medical issues which may impact their readiness. Here are some guidelines to help you navigate your way down the path of food textures.

Setting the Stage: 0-4 months

In the months leading up to introducing solid foods, encourage your baby to explore different textures and sensations with his/her mouth. Mouthing or oral stimulation with toys, hands, teethers, and mouth brushes helps to pave the way toward solid...

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25 Sensory Play Ideas to Help with Picky Eating

This week's blog completes a 3-part series on sensory issues and feeding. Part 1 explained sensory issues and how and why they impact feeding. Part 2 provided tips to help reduce sensory overload during mealtimes.

Here are some fun, play-based sensory activities to help your child become more comfortable with new foods. Remember that kids learn about new foods through repeated exposure, food play, and sensory exploration. It's important not to pressure your child to eat/try the foods during sensory play...just model your own enjoyment of the foods and have fun learning about new foods through sight, smell, touch, and sound. The tasting part will come with time, practice, and patience.

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Are you doing this? Do This Instead! Sensory Issues and Feeding – Part 2

Last week’s blog aimed to provide some insight into sensory issues and simplify a somewhat confusing question: “Does your child have sensory issues?”. If the answer is yes or even maybe, then this week’s blog is for you!

Let’s jump right into 13 bite-sized tips to help your sensory-kiddo with feeding.


Tip 1 - Calm The Kitchen

Are you doing this?

 Mealtimes are busy in your household. The kitchen is bustling with people. You are cooking. It’s loud. The lights are bright. Dinner is suddenly “READY!!” You bring your child quickly to the table.

Do this instead! 

Kids with sensory issues may find mealtimes overwhelming. The noise, the smells, the bright lights, the talking. Try reducing the chaos. Put on some chilled music, dim the lights, and talk in a calm voice. Warn your child ahead of time that it will be dinner soon, so they are not startled when transitioning from a favourite activity...

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Sensory Issues and Feeding Simplified

Does your child have sensory issues?

I always ask this question as part of my intake questionnaire when conducting a feeding assessment. Immediately after saying it, I try to provide parents with an explanation, because in my opinion it’s a very confusing question.

What are sensory issues?

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) is a complex neurological disorder that affects the way sensations are experienced and processed. SPD exists when sensory signals don’t get organized into appropriate responses and, as a result, a child’s daily routine and activities are disrupted (Miller 2006).

Here’s the way I explain it to parents…

We use our senses to take-in information about the world around us. This includes our well-known five senses: sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch. Did you know there are also three other “hidden” senses, that most of us aren’t familiar with: proprioception (receptors in our joints, muscles, and bones that give us...

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Mealtime Mess vs. Manners

“I hate the mess at meals.”

“I have a real problem with messiness.”

“Her grandparents won’t allow it.”

“My husband can’t stand the mess.”

“Mess teaches bad manners.”

These are common responses from parents when I tell them that I want them to let their baby (or toddler) get good and messy during mealtimes. You know…squish banana between their little fingers, rub tomato sauce through their hair, poke/prod and roll peas, watch mashed potatoes go splat and giggle as carrots bounce off the kitchen floor.

Simply put…mess is best. Children learn to eat and accept new foods if they are provided with opportunities to get messy. Eating is an experience that engages all of our 5 senses: touch, smell, tastes, sight, and sound. Kids that are encouraged to explore food and get messy tend to be less picky and more likely to eat a variety of foods and textures. Messy mealtimes foster independence by...

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Feeding Issues & Toothbrushing - 10 Tips to Help

Toothbrushing: Who, What, Where, When, Why, & How

I am not a dentist. I’m a Feeding Therapist, so when I ask parents to add toothbrushing to their child’s daily routine, it’s less to do with tooth care and more to do with feeding development.

Many families I have worked with over the years have been advised by a dentist to hold their child down and forcefully brush their teeth. As a Feeding Therapist working with children with severe sensory issues and oral aversion, I do not practice or recommend this approach. I believe that positive toothbrushing experiences support feeding progress and development.

Why?

Toothbrushing is good for your child’s oral health and an essential component of his/her general health. From a feeding perspective, kids that can tolerate mouth stimulation like toothbrushing are generally better able to handle mouth stimulation like food. Toothbrushing supports feeding development. When children can tolerate toothbrushing,...

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Tube Feeding and Tube Weaning: Part 2 - Answering Parent Questions

In last week's blog, I discussed parent questions and emotions around the decision to place a feeding tube. This week I continue the topic of tube feeding and share some of my experience about weaning children from their tubes when the time is right.

As discussed in Part 1 last week, every child and family has a unique experience with tube feeding; some children need a feeding tube for a very short time, others may require tube feedings for several years, and some kids will need a tube for their lifetime in order to support their health, growth, and nutrition. 

It's my belief and practice that regardless of a child's unique needs with a feeding tube, there is always something that can be done to provide positive oral (mouth) experiences. Even for children that are not able to eat safely, we must not forget their mouth and all of the senses we engage while enjoying food. For a child that is tube-fed, this could involve receiving a tube feed during family meals, or...

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Tube Feeding and Learning to Eat: Part 1 - Answering Parent Questions

Children with medical challenges (e.g., prematurity, cardiac, respiratory, neurological, gastrointestinal, swallowing), and/or severe feeding aversion may require tube feedings to support their growth and nutrition. There are many reasons why children have difficulty with feeding.  While some children will outgrow the need for a feeding tube, others will have a feeding tube for their lifetime. As a Feeding Therapist, I seek to support parents and caregivers of children that are tube-fed regardless of their unique experience. It is important to recognize that what may work for one child and family, may not work for another.

Tube feedings are intended to partially or fully replace calories from oral feedings and may be recommended to enhance weight gain or improve the nutritional status of a child who aspirates (food or liquid enters airway/lungs) or does not have the endurance to meet nutritional needs via oral feedings.

In my experience, feeding tubes are often viewed as the...

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How to Help Your Picky Eater Accept New Foods: Part 3

This week’s blog completes my 3-part series about how to help your picky eater to accept new foods.

In Part 1, I discussed how children learn to accept new foods through a sensory hierarchy of looking, touching, smelling, kissing, licking, biting and spitting-out, and eventually chewing and swallowing. In order to help your child work through these steps, your job is to provide repeated exposure to new foods in order for your child to learn about them.

In Part 2, I shared information about the child vs caregivers’ role at mealtimes. I provided actionable 10-tips to help your child work toward food acceptance.

Hopefully, you now have a better understanding of the steps children go through when learning about new foods along with your role as caregiver to help your child be successful.

Now for Part-3. Here’s how to keep the ball rolling and continue to encourage your child to explore new foods.
The Set-Up
  • Don’t present too many new foods all at once
  • Offer...
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10 Tips to Help Picky Eaters Accept New Foods: Part 2

In last week’s blog (Part 1), I shared the sensory steps that kids often go through when learning to accept a new food. Your child may not be ready to chew and swallow a new food; however, he/she may be comfortable looking, squishing, smelling, or kissing the food. In time, he/she will work toward food acceptance, at his/her own pace.

Parents and kids both have jobs at mealtimes:

Ellyn Satter is a renowned Registered Dietician who termed the “Division of Responsibility” or Golden Rule in feeding: Adults decide what food is served, when it is served, and where. The child decides how much to eat, and whether to eat at all.  I highly recommend her website (link in references below) and resources. I often share Ellyn’s golden rule as a handout with the families I work with and I ask them to post-in on their fridge as a daily reminder: 

10 Tips to Help Parents with their Feeding Job:

1. Family Meals
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